[montage of Leo White photographs]

1928-1945
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Details


Production Date
1928-1945
Description
Leo White collection of 30 photographs mounted on large board, originally there were 31 but there is space close to the bottom right where a photograph is missing. All except the bottom left one are in black wooden frames under glass, the glass in missing on the bottom left photograph.

The photographs on the board, from the top left and from the left of each row, are:

Row 1: 1 Framed set of three photographs, sticker 18 in left bottom corner.

1a Awarua, ZK-AMC, facing right, landing on the sea. Probably on arrival in Auckland on 3rd April 1940, flown by Captain Oscar Garden and First Officer Chris Griffiths from England bringing out further Tasman Airways staff.

1b Teal Awarua, new on arrival, 1940. A group of seven, three women, men in uniform. From Whites Aviation collection five of the group are named from left to right: Jeff Wells, Mrs Wells, Oscar Garden, Chris Griffiths, Mrs Griffiths. (copy and a similar photograph can be found in Whites Aviation Collection under TEAL misc file). Oscar Garden flew a regular service to Rose Bay in Sydney.

1c Tasman Empire Airways 1940. Tasman Empire flying boats, Awarua (foreground) and Aotearoa at Mechanics Bay. There are people standing in the foreground before the fenced walkway down to the docks. There are three people walking up on the right with the lower end of the walkway to the left. On the left are two dock that run out to sea at right angles to the walkway. One figure is about to step onto the dock. Two figures are at the end of the dock next to a moored boat. Sitting on the sea are the two flying boats facing left and showing their left sides with a boat behind them. Figures can be seen on the boat and it appears to the headed towards the Awarua. (published copy in Wingspread opposite page 161).

2 Imperial Airways flying boat Centaurus crew, including Captain Burgess, and aviation officials at Auckland December 27 1937. Group of 14 men in uniform and suits with signatures underneath the image. The signatures are: T. M. Wil?es, Maurice Clark, A. Cowe, B. Blythe, Colin F. Elden, S. V. Broughton, H. Dangerfield, J. W. Bingham, J. M. Burgess, N. Falla. Sticker 15 is on the bottom left corner. (published copy in Wingspread opposite page 160, also photographs with White’s Aviation Collection under Centaurus survey).

3 Sticker 11 in bottom left corner. Front and right side of VH-UON with a group of men gathered around the nose of the Puss Moth. Leaning against the door is a man who is probably Nicholl. Ex G-AATC, this was the first production Puss Moth, imported into Australia in August 1930 had several owners in NSW (including J.J. Leahy) after being sold by de Havilland Aircraft Pty Ltd of Mascot. It was owned by R.G. Whitehead and R.Nichols in 1934, by then named "Faith in New Zealand" prior to their flight from Gerringong Beach, NSW to Doubtless Bay, then on to Auckland, New Zealand. It later became ZK-ADU (Information on G-AATC from: http://www.edcoatescollection.com/ac1/austu/VH-UON.html)

4 Sticker 11 in bottom left corner. Nicholl and Whitehead sitting in the cockpit of a plane, 1934. Whitehead is on the right, to the front of the plane, and has his head turned over his shoulder so that he is smiling at the viewer. Nichol is seated behind Whitehead, at a higher level. He also has his head turned but is watching something to his right and towards the front of the plane. In the space between the two men and on the other side of the plane are two faces, one is a child with his hand raised as if he/she is sucking his/her thumb, the other is a smiling woman. According to a caption in Wings across the Pacific Whitehead squats between Nicholl’s legs, demonstrating how the two men managed to squeeze into the tiny space that remained after the 100-gallon cabin tank was installed. The plane is possibly Faith in New Zealand, and the photograph is possibly related to the Tasman crossing on November 22 1934 from Gerringong to Doubtless Bay in Northland in 14 hours and 40 minutes. (Latter sentence from 50th anniversary – first Tasman flight Sept 11th 1928 from Richmond, Sydney to Wigram, Christchurch ; published copy of photograph in Wings across the Pacific p.130 ; published copy in Wingspread opp. p. 113).

5 Sticker 8 in bottom left corner. Faith in Australia flying to the left. The registration number is on the body of the plane. Landscape and clouds form the background. VH-UXX Formerly VH-UMI Southern Moon purchased by C. T. P. Ulm in 1933, re-registered as VH-UXX, re-named Faith in Australia. Flown across the Tasman by Charles Ulm and G. U. “Scotty” Allen on 3rd December from Sydney to New Plymouth in 14 hours and 27 minutes. Of particular historic significance was the carrying of the first women to cross the Tasman by air – Mrs Ulm and K. Rogers. Three return flights were made by Ulm 1933-34 in VH-UXX (from 50th anniversary – first Tasman flight Sept 11th 1928 from Richmond, Sydney to Wigram, Christchurch ; more detail on life of airplane in The Routes of the valkyries p. 67).

6 Sticker 4 in bottom left corner. Avro Avian G-ABC Southern Cross Junior after crashing at Harihari. Guy Menzies is in the centre. The image shows a group of people around an upside down plane. It’s nose is resting on the ground to the left. The wings are at an angle with the forward edge on the ground. The tail is still in the air. Part of the registration number (G-A) is painted on the underside of the wing. Guy Menzies is standing next to the nose of the plane with his left arm resting on the belly of the nose. He is wearing rolled up trousers, a long sleeved shirt with the sleeves rolled up and a stripped tie. He is looking towards the viewer. (Published copy in Civil aviation in New Zealand : an illustrated history p.31)

7 Photograph of Lieutenant John Moncrieff (left) and Captain George Hood standing next to an airplane at Richmond Aerodrome, Sydney, on the eve of their bid to be the first to fly the Tasman Sea. Both men are wearing suits. Hood's left hand rests on the propeller. Sticker 1 on bottom left corner.

Row 2:

8 Sticker 17 on bottom left corner. Aotearoa’s delivery crew. Group of men standing with partial sign for Pan American on the building to the left behind them. The men are wearing three styles of uniform with two different badges. Along the bottom of the photograph are signatures. It has been signed by: R. S. Peak (engineer), E. R Macnamara (engineer), B. Knee (chief engine inspector), S. J. Bradshaw (instrument engineer), G.Brown (instrument engineer), J. W Burgess (Captain), W. J. Craig (first officer), W. G. Cousins (senior radio officer), R. A. Phillips (flight clerk). (Published copy in Journeying with aviators in New Zealand p. 52, copy in Whites Aviation collection under TEAL)

9 Sticker 16 on bottom left corner. Imperial Airways Centaurus in flight. The plane is flying to the left at an angle away from the viewer. G-ADUT is painted on the tail, with Imperial Airways London painted next to the door and Centaurus painted on the nose. Land, trees and houses can be seen under the plane. The arrival of the Centaurus captained by J. W. Burgess on Auckland harbour on 27 December 1939 demonstrated the practicability of a regular trans Tasman service. (latter sentence from 50th anniversary – first Tasman flight Sept 11th 1928 from Richmond, Sydney to Wigram, Christchurch).

10 Sticker 12 on bottom left corner. Conclusion of W. H. (Pat) O’Hara’s successful Tasman flight, Mangere, October 18 1935. Shows the Klemm Eagle as it came to rest after crashing through a fence at Mangere. The fence is in the background. The plane is resting on the ground with its nose to the left. Two men (one with his arms folded, one with his hands in his pockets) are standing behind the right wing with a partial view of a third figure standing next to the plane. Parts of other figures can be seen standing in front of the right wing. (Unframed photograph in White’s Aviation collection under Pat O’Hara as well as a newspaper photograph layout on the Tasman flight).

11 W. H. (Pat) O’Hara October 18 1935 after the Tasman flight, enjoying his first meal at the Herald Office in New Zealand. Sticker 12 on bottom left corner (published partial copy in Wingspread opposite page 113, as well as part of a newspaper photograph layout on the Tasman flight in White’s Aviation collection under Pat O’Hara).

12 Sticker 14 on bottom left corner. Ernle Clark with Percival Gull, Tasman flight, Blenheim November 1936. The Gull is on the ground facing right with a partial view of the registration number (ZK-AF) on the body. Ernle Clark is standing in front of the wing with his right hand resting on the wing. He is dressed in a dark suit and tie. (copy in Whites Aviation Collection under Ernle Clark).

13 Sticker 9 on bottom left corner. Tasman flight, Faith in Australia, 1934, Muriwai, Auckland. Five men sitting at a set table including flowers in a vase. The man on the left is facing to the right with his cutlery in his hands and is about to raise something from his plate. The next two men are facing the viewer, the one on the left is smiling and holding an egg in his left hand. The one on the right is holding the handle of a cup on a saucer in his right hand The two men on the right are leaning on the table and are facing left at an angle to the viewer. (copy in Whites Aviation Collection under Personalities).

14 Sticker 5 on bottom left corner. Francis Chichester. A man in flying helmet and goggles, wearing glasses and a heavy jacket standing next to mechanical apparatus. He is facing to the right with his head turned almost to face the viewer. Behind his head is what looks like a crane’s hook. Two suggestions for place are Hobson or Parengarenga. The latter location was the beginning of a non-stop flight to Australia. Chichester crashed on Lord Howe Island. After the plane was repaired he flew onto Australia. A published photograph of Chichester in similar clothing on the float of his Gypsy Moth plane can be found in Francis Chichester within the plates between pp.72-73. (copy in Whites Aviation Collection under Personalities).

15 Sticker 2 on bottom left corner. Tasman flight 1928. George Hood (left) and John Moncrieff standing next to their Ryan monoplane. The plane is at an angle to the right showing the left side, front and both wings. A partial registration (G-A) can be seen on the body of the plane behind the wing. (copy in Whites Aviation Collection under Hood and Moncrieff).

Row 3:

16

17 Sticker 17on bottom left corner. Heralding a new era of international aviation and the founding of New Zealand’s Tasman Empire Airways Ltd, Aotearoa, piloted by Captain John Burgess, arrives in Auckland on 28 August 1939. Shows the side of the Aotearoa flying to the left. Aotearoa and ZK-AMA can be seen on the side. The buildings of Auckland city can be seen in the background. (published copy in Journeying with aviators in New Zealand p. 47).

18 Sticker 20 on bottom left corner. City fathers including Freddy Jones

19 Sticker 10 on bottom left corner. Image of a plane on the ground surrounded by people. Part of the registration can be seen on the wing: AC. A Dragon Rapide, registered as ZK-ACO, named Tainui, was entered in the London to Melbourne Centenary Air Race. It was flown in the race by J. D. Hewett and C. E. Kay with Frank Stewart as the radio operator in November 14 1934. This photograph was taken at the Milson Aerodrome in Palmerston North after the plane was slightly damaged. It never completed the race.

20 1934 Melbourne Centenary air race. Shows Cyril Kay (left), Captain Jim Hewitt (centre) and Frank Stewart (right) standing beside a plane. Part of the body of the plane can seen. The three men are standing behind the wing and in front of the body of the plane. Sticker 10 on bottom left corner.

21 Jean Batten welcomed home at the conclusion of the England-New Zealand flight, October 16, 1936. Sticker 13 on bottom left corner. Jean Batten is walking forward surrounded by a group of men in uniform. Behind the men in uniform are policemen and members of the crowd. She is smiling. Wearing a overcoat over flying gear and holding a bouquet of flowers in her right hand. The man on her left is holding a ribbon or streamer. (published copy in Alone in the sky opposite p. 111)

22 Sticker 8 on bottom left corner. G. U. (Scotty) Allen, Charles Ulm, and R. N. Bolton on Muriwai Beach, Tasman flight, probably Faith in Australia Tasman flight. Muriwai provided a long runway for a plane taking off with a full load of fuel. Faith in Australia (VH-UXX) was flown across the Tasman by Charles Ulm and G. U. “Scotty” Allen on 3rd December from Sydney to New Plymouth in 14 hours and 27 minutes. (copy in Whites Aviation Collection under Notable flights NZ).

23 Missing – Photograph in Whites under Personalities, taken 28/4/45, shows half of montage with a different mount and frame and the missing photograph in place. Shows plane probably taking off at an angle to the right.

24 Sticker 3 on bottom left corner. Southern Cross, Christchurch 1928. Shows the Southern Cross, flying at an angle to the right, in the air above a large crowd of people. The field is full of people with vegetation and houses in the background. In the right foreground it looks like two people holding hands but is in fact three people, a man at the back hiding all except an arm of an other person who is holding the hand of a person to the man’s right. The impression is that there are a reasonable number of young people, perhaps school children, in the crowd. (copy in Whites Aviation Collection under Southern Cross). Possible taken when people had the chance to pay for a joy ride in the Southern Cross.

Row 4:

25 Framed set of three photographs, sticker 19 in left bottom corner.

25a Opening of the Tasman service, New Zealand-Australia April 30 1940. Brigadier N.S. Falla (left), F. A. Barrow and Hon. F. Jones, Minister of Defence. Jones is holding a model of ZK-AMA in his left hand, showing the right side of the model. (published copy in Wingspread opposite page 161, several copies in Whites Aviation Collection under TEAL misc file).

25b Tasman Empire flying boat Aotearoa (registration ZK-AMA) sitting on water moored to dock. Aotearoa is facing outwards but the tail and both wings are within the image. There is a group in the foreground lining the dock, all with their backs to the viewer and facing the flying boat. Possibly taken at the opening of Tasman service between Auckland and Sydney.

25c: TEAL opening of Tasman service, Auckland-Sydney. First passengers. April 30th 1940. A group of nine men and women. The man in the centre is facing left, in overalls and has his right hand stretched out behind him resting on the gangway. Another man in overalls and a hat with an emblem is standing behind him. Next to him is a woman facing the viewer. She is wearing a hat, dress and a coat with a fur collar. She is holding what looks like a pillow, a blanket and a parcel in her left arm. To her left is a partial view of another woman. To the left of the central man are an other five men. Most are looking towards the viewer. Most are wearing coats and hats. To have hats with emblems on them. The man on the far left is holding a parcel, a container and gloves in his left hand. (copy in Whites Aviation Collection under TEAL misc file ; also a second image with the same passengers from a different angle showing the gangway to the open door of the plane in Whites Aviation Collection under TEAL base scenes).

26 Sticker 17 on bottom left corner. Possibly Charles William Anderson Scott and Tom Campbell Black during or after the 1934 Melbourne Centenary air race. They won the race flying the Grosvernor House (G-ACSS). Shows two men with a Comet cockpit in the background. One man is stepping out of the cockpit (Black?), the other man (Scott?) is standing on the wing with his left hand on the edge of the cockpit. The airplane they are standing on is a DH88 Comet racer.

27 Sticker 17 on bottom left corner. Australian Anniversary on the ground, facing right, with moving propellers. The name can be seen on the nose and a partial registration (G-A) can be seen on the body of the plane behind the wing. Originally the Grosvenor House G-ACSS DH88 Comet renamed Australian Anniversary used by Arthur Clouston to attempt the England-Australia record. The aircraft was renamed "Australian Anniversary" for the Australian sesquicentenial and the first attempt started on February 6, 1938. A successful attempt began on March 15, arriving in Sydney three days and nine hours later. The next day Clouston and Victor Ricketts continued on in the aircraft to New Zealand making the Tasman crossing in a record seven hours 27 minutes, arriving at Blenheim (where Clouston had learnt to fly) on March 20. The following day the return flight took eight hours 31 minutes. The England- New Zealand leg had taken 4 days 8 hours 37 minutes. The return trip to England on March 26 had taken 10 days 21 hours and 22 minutes. The Tasman record stood until 1945. (from the Internet and from 50th anniversary – first Tasman flight Sept 11th 1928 from Richmond, Sydney to Wigram, Christchurch).

28 Sticker 13 on bottom left corner. Jean Batten’s Percival Gull, arrival at Mangere, Auckland, October 1936. The Percival Gull landed and facing right at a slight angle so that the front and both wings can be seen. There is a man behind the tip of the left wing leaning on it and it looks like he is pulling it back. In the foreground in front of the plane is a figure in a coat with both elbows bend so his arms are level and bending forward over his chest. In the background is a large crowd of people. (Published copy in Alone in the sky between pages 110-111, copy in Whites Aviation Collection under Jean Batten).

29 Sticker 9 on bottom left corner. On the left is Miss N. Rogers (Charles Ulm’s secretary) dressed in a hat, suit and a spotted tie. Her right arm is bent at waist level. Her left arm is bent with a handbag and in the crook of her left arm. She is wearing gloves and both hands rest on the bag. A piece of woven or knitted fabric is over her left arm, between the handbag and her arm. She is smiling and facing the viewer but looking at something to her left. On the right is Mrs Ulm dressed in a hat, fox fur, stripped top and a suit. Her right arm is bent at waist level with her hand resting on the end of her handbag.. Her left arm is bent with her left hand holding her handbag from underneath it. She is facing the viewer but looking at something to her left. They are both standing in front of Faith in Australia. Part of the side of the plane, part of a wing strut and part of the registration number (UXX) can be seen. Faith in Australia (VH-UXX) was flown across the Tasman by Charles Ulm and G. U. “Scotty” Allen on 3rd December from Sydney to New Plymouth in 14 hours and 27 minutes. Of particular historic significance was the carrying of the first women to cross the Tasman by air – Mrs Ulm and K. Rogers. (latter two sentences from 50th anniversary – first Tasman flight Sept 11th 1928 from Richmond, Sydney to Wigram, Christchurch).

30 Sticker 7 on bottom left corner. Smithy’s Tasman flight 1933. Smithy at Ninety Mile Beach with Southern Cross. Group of five men facing the viewer with a partial view of the planes propellers, engine and body in the background. From left to right: Charles Kingsford Smith, J. T. Pethybridge, John Stannage, P. G. Taylor and H. A Litchfield? Behind the group of five men and before the body of the plane is a second group of people who are mostly hidden behind the front group. (copy in Whites Aviation Collection under Southern Cross).

31 The Southern Cross with Smithy, Ulm, McWilliams and Litchfield, over New Zealand during the first Tasman crossing in September 1928. Shows the Southern Cross flying to the right with Mount Taranaki/Egmont in the background. VH-USU and Southern Cross are painted on the side of the plane. (Published copy in Charles Kingsford Smith pp. 68-69)
Physical Description
30 photographs : black and white ; 103 x 269 cm.
Current Rights
Copyright Undetermined
Accession No
06-459
Credit Line
1928-1945. [montage of Leo White photographs], 06-459. Walsh Memorial Library, The Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT).
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