Aircraft [de Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth (‘ZK-ANN’)]

The de Havilland Aircraft Company Limited, Manufacturer;  Aircraft Service (NZ) Limited, Commissioned by; 

1942
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Details


Maker and Role
The de Havilland Aircraft Company Limited, Manufacturer
Aircraft Service (NZ) Limited, Commissioned by
Production Date
1942
1979
Description
Tiger Moth, red, a single-engine, wire-braced, biplane of composite construction fitted with a de Havilland Gipsy Major engine driving a fixed pitch propeller. It has a fixed 2-wheel main undercarriage and a tailskid which can be steered. The aircraft is constructed mainly of wood, except for the fuselage which is steel tubing and plywood. Restoration covering is Ceconite (Dacron and polyester fibre cloth) and acrylic fibre. This material is used in micro-lights and yacht sails. The fuselage is welded steel tubing forming rigid replaceable units comprising 2 engine bays, side frames, 2 front fuselage side frames, cross members to join these and a single rear fuselage frame. The engine bay side frames are triangular and constructed of 3 7/8 inch square section tubes, welded flat. Power plant: 130 HP Gipsy Major engine.
ZK-BJH made 1942 (original craft)
ZK-ANN made 1979 (restoration)

De Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth, Stat S, 84664 (T.6238), Registration ZK-BJH.
Aircraft Sales and Service Limited
Aerial Spraying Limited
AHS 3/44
Crashed and possibly written off at Oriki, Manawatu. Crop spraying aircraft with cut-down forward fuselage.

Description from copied record 2003.333:
De Havilland Tiger Moth - ZK-ANN - biplane of tubular steel frame and fuselage covered with Ceconite, an aircraft Dacron covering material. The wings are also covered with Ceconite. The undercarriage is constructed with 2 metal rods and 4 aluminium strut supports. There is one seat in the cockpit for the pilot and just forward of the cockpit, is an instructor's seat independent of the cockpit. There is an open side canopy above the cockpit. The canopy is made of ribbed metal and tear-shaped. The heavier edge of the tear is to the front of the aeroplane which affords an aerodynamic shape to the canopy. The canopy is held by double aluminium struts. The engine cowling is made of aluminium. The propeller is made of wood and consists of a single shaft with a blade at either end.

The engine is a 4-cylinder motor with 4 exhaust pipes. The engine is mounted directly behind the propeller which is positioned at the front of the aeroplane. The wings are positioned parallel with each other and directly above and in line with each other. 2 wings on each side of the aeroplane. These wings are supported by aluminium rods. The lower wings on either side of the aeroplane have aerons allowing for the raising and lowering of the flaps. The undercarriage consists of 2 rubber pneumatic tyres approximately 450 mm high on the end of metal struts. The aeroplane is painted red in the front and this colour extends to just behind the cockpit. The rear fuselage, wings and tail section are painted silver. The wing and fuselage markings are in red. The markings are: ZK-ANN. The front marking reads: 'Aircraft Service (NZ) Ltd.' Following this is a pair of wings with the map of New Zealand outlined in the middle of the 2 wings. Below these wings are the words 'Mangere Aerodrome'.

The dimensions are: Span 8.95 m, Length 7.32 m, Height 2.71 m, Weight 506 kg.
Media/Materials
Processed Material/Metal/Alloy/Steel
Organic/Vegetal/Wood
Processed Material/Synthetic/Plastic/Polyester/Ceconite
Signature/Marks and Type
ZK-ANN Painted
AIRCRAFT SERVICE (NZ) LTD. / MANGERE AERODROME Sticker
Accession No
1967.191
Credit Line
The de Havilland Aircraft Company Limited et al. 1942
1979. Aircraft [de Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth (‘ZK-ANN’)], 1967.191. The Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT).
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